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modern technology really helped investigators at every step along the way during the manhunt. we had the isolation of the still photographs of the two suspects that they issued to the public, issued to the world. and then, of course, we learned this. how after that carjacking on friday night and the alleged victim left behind a cell phone, that was in the car, that is how investigators were able to follow the ping of the cell phone in order to locate the two suspects in watertown. but right now all eyes are on the remaining suspect who is still alive dzhokhar tsarnaev. as investigators try to find out what secrets he holds. even if suspect dzhokhar tsarnaev wanted to cooperate with the fbi, he couldn't. sources tell cnn because of injuries to his throat the 19-year-old suspected bomb r can't talk yet. he's intubated and sedated. >> all the law enforcement professionals are hoping for a host of reasons that the suspect survives because we have many questions. those questions need to be answered. >> in this photograph taken right after his arrest, the college student's neck area appear
? >> chris, there's a lot of technological advances from the old days of, you know, the mugshot photo book. certainly there's facial recognition software. all of those techniques, you know, advanced techniques will be used in this case. and i agree with the other comments made that it's not going to take long for somebody to recognize these people. >> yeah, there's an interesting database, chris, ever since 2003, we've been taking photographs and digital fingerprints of people coming into this country under u.s. visit. i think there are over 80 million digital photographs there. i just don't know. maybe one of your guests will tell whether or not the fbi -- >> how many? >> 80 million. everybody who's come across at an airport internationally, we have fingerprints and a digital photograph. >> everyone who has gone internationally -- >> no, everybody who's come into the united states. >> as a visitor. >> as a visitor. under u.s. visit. we got their digital photograph and we have their -- a couple fingerpri fingerprints. >> wouldn't they match that up if they have these visual images? >> i do
we need to do is update the law to go alongside the changes in technologies that are sending each other letters. we send each other e-mails instead of keeping europe letter in your pocket you may stored in the cloud somewhere and that's should have the same privacy that you regular snail mail does in the post office delivering something and if we can do that. we have updated this from time to time, the technology changes. the technology has been changing quicker but to send someone an e-mail is like sending them a letter. it's the same thing. the fourth amendment is still there. >> host: also joining our roundtable today is -- of the hill newspaper. >> my first question is for mr. norquist. i'm wondering why he decided to get involved with this issue invites important? >> guest: americans for tax reform is long been interested in taxing the internet and regulating the internet and everything that deals with the size of government is of interest to americans for tax reform because we can't keep taxes low at the government keeps spending what it does. the same questions for privacy
-year communication and technology plan for fiscal year 2013-2014 through fiscal year 2017-18 pursuant to administrative code section 22a.6. >> president chiu. >> thank you, mr. chair. again, i want to thank the members of the budget committee for the consideration and support of the five-year information and communication technology plan which i had several years ago in legislation asked that our city's i-t staff put together so that we can have a framework about how we plan invest in technology. and i do support the plan as it's laid out. one thing i would just notice, though, for colleagues is that over the next five years we have about $200 million of capital needs that we have within our ict areas and i think it's important for us to think about that, to think about how we can make government more efficient and effective through the use of technology, and to do this in a way that really increases public access and transparency. but all that being said, colleagues, i hope that you will be able to support this plan and i want to haltake a moment to thank the members of coyt and i-t
department, mta, department of technology and others to bring our communications systems up to the 21st century. i think there's been some -- not i think, i know there's been a lot of confusion about what i believe president chiu referred to as the multiple radio projects. and i want to -- i hope i can dispel those misconceptions today. i'm going to try to keep it very simple because this is really complex issues. and i have my technical people here with me so that if, in fact, i can't answer a question, they certainly can for you. so, we are, you know, from our perspective, we are not duplicating efforts. we have separate projects that are occurring that are all very necessary. the four that i'm going to talk about today, and i see that it looks like ed rifkin who has been here since 1:30, had to leave for another meeting. so, it's unfortunate. but henry is here from mta if we have mta questions. so, the four that i want to summarize today are the public safety radio replacement, that's the 800 megahertz system, the bay web project, the mta system, and the public service radio replacem
and help us sort of navigate the intricacies of the technology and how we can incorporate these two size at thexv. so, i think there are opportunities for collaboration in the future. one other point is that the mta transit system is a very unique technology. and i know that it's being designed very specifically for the needs of the transportation agency. for example, coverage of the system is targeted for the bus route and the transit route, whereas in a public safety network, you have to design the network for a full city-wide coverage, in building, below ground. and, so, there are several requirements that we're going to need to take into consideration as we start planning for the replacement of the 800 megahertz public safety system. so, we would like an expert advice and consultant to really help navigate those type of issues. >> and i guess what i would say to that is my understanding is the sfmta's psvrn system included both transit data, voice component as well as public safety grade p 25 voice radio system. so, in other words, the sfmta system could be used by public safety folk
in power, with sewer, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy gene
miller. the spread of mobile technology is a vital part of the tech revolution. it also raise miss questions about how the world will change as people become increasingly connected. this week, experts explored those questions at all the t all things digital conference that was held here in new york. joining me with the of the people who led the discussion, walt mossberg is principal technology colnist in for the "wall street journal" and kara swisher, also a "wall street journal" technology columnist in. i am pleased to have them here at this table because this is the first time they have ever appeared together at the same place. right? sflp >> well, with you. >> rose: oh, you've done interviews together. >> we've never been on a good show. (laughter) >> rose: i'll take it. okay, give me the headlines coming out of all things -- >> the headline is that everything is moving to mobile. if you ask companies like any social network, e-commerce companies, many of them appeared at the conference, small ones, big ones, the percentage of people doing their reading, transactions, checking w
that relative to technology as well, but on a monthly basis we report enforcement operation plans. we have a conduit by which we provide traffic collision information. it's not the most effective and efficient way of doing it, but we have that in place currently. as i get further in the presentation i will point out there is technology we want to have basically in place and pilot in place by june that is effectively real time in terms of not only traffic collision information about also enforcement. >> thank you. >> all right. so as we talk about the issue of enforcement and prioritizing in december of last year the mta issued an analysis of all traffic collisions over the last 10 years and i think that was referenced earlier. in identifying the top collision factors involved in our collisions speeding red light, failure to yield to pedestrians, stop signs and fail to yield when taking a u turn are part of the chief's directive to all personnel of the police department to focus on the five, so the five being speeding, the red light stop sign violations, fail to yield -- >> i
affected technology along the highest traffic areas on the border. to expedite travel and trade, reducing weight times, the budget requests an additional 3500 port officers, 1600 paid for by appropriation. the increase to the emigration user fees that have not been adjusted since 2001. the budget in vests and recapitalization of coast guard the seven national security cut her. -- cutter. and the response of smart and effective enforcement of immigration laws. and the integrity of the system through initiatives such as deferred action for childhood arrivals and greater use of prosecutorial discretion. -- budget makes significant its more cost efficient like a nationwide implementation of secure communities. adherents to work side related laws. while continuing to support alternatives to the attention reform and immigrant immigration efforts. comprehensive immigration reform will help us continue to build on these efforts and strengthen border security by enabling dhs to focus on criminals, human smugglers. next to safeguard as secure as cyberspace, this makes significant investments to str
and for this center to be refurbished, technology wise, space wise and adding things like made in san francisco. i have to say that because for me i got to talk about san francisco in ireland, in paris, i'm going to talk about it beginning tomorrow night the day after when i arrive in beijing that we are really on our way to kind of manufacturing beautiful wonderful things that people can take with them that they are looking for all the time. i got those inquiries. what are you making in san francisco, the middle class in china, they have money to spend, they are investing all over the world. i want them to invest here along with the other 400,000 visitors that come through here and take the advantage of the exposure and what everybody associated with the movement here. we can have more of the products, more of the accessories, more of the things that they want to have as memories, but also make on going connections with us. i want to thank all the volunteers that are working here because, you know, you do it for the love of the city. if the visitors who speak multiple different languages walk in
2001, what have we learned about investigating these sorts of incidents? and even the technology itself, as it improved significantly since then? >> it really has. and i would say on almost every front, the improvements are really significant. what we have defended against extremely effectively, is a large-scale catastrophic attack like what we saw on 9/11. and these sorts of things, our intelligence, our coordination on investigation, across agencies, between the federal and local government, are vastly better. our technology for detecting explosives and follow-up investigations, vastly better. these sorts of attacks, as tragic as it was. 3 people killed, over 100 wounded, there's still of a relatively small scale. again, it's not surprising to me that you could have an attack like this and not see information either from the fbi or overseas, that was international terrorism, indicating there might be some threat, either generally or pointed at boston. the level of professionalism and understanding of how now to investigate this and the level of coordination, is markedly better. that w
to make it a hub for developing new technology to increase overseas production. construction of the plant started in 2007. the new factory will mainly produce compact cars for the domestic market beginning this summer. so lar panels are installed on the roof of the factory. they're expected to generate up to 2.6 mega watts of electricity. honda's new plant in japan is considered unusual. many japanese automakers have been shifting production over seas to try to capture a bigger market share in emerging countries. >> translator: this facility will play the role of the mother plant. we will develop new production and other technologies here and use them in overseas factories. >>> many of the world's top businesses have their eyes set on brazil. they will host big sport events, the world cup in 2014 and the olympics two acquiyears later. also there is a competition for managers looking for cheap labor. nhk has more. >> reporter: brazil's major cities are experiences a construction boom. wages are rising and companies are having trouble finding enough workers. they are now turning their eyes
. joining us now to talk about the earnings from intel and yahoo and the out look for the technology sector. is the portfolio manager of the t-rowe price technology fund. the thing that ties the companies egg together, they are about two companies trying to reinvent themselves. in the case of intel, does it have what it takes to reinvent itself, and jump start the company. and in the case of yahoo, is the turn around strategy works? >> thank you for having me on. it's nice to be with you. you hit the nail on the head, both are reinvention stories. -- intel, the segment that they sell into, the pcs are under a lot of pressure. i smiled in the segment leading into this. people are not using their pcs as much as they did in the past. so, i think intel does have what it takes to turn around eventually but it will be a slow process to establish themselves in the smartphone and tablet market. yahoo is going through a turn around and what we saw this quarter was not much evidence of a fundamental turn around in yahoo's business with revenues down a bit year on year, so tato one is still on the com
,000 gallons a day. it is the beginning of understanding and feeling comfortable with this technology that can be scaled up into eco districts and community scale systems, campus-type systems where in those situations when the water is reused and the numbers are much higher, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 gallons a day, imagine the savings on that that you're getting. you're not purchasing freshwater and you're not using the sewer and being charged appropriately. this wastewater processing and reuse technology is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we
like bank of america which missed earnings estimates. and in technology stocks, tech bell whether apple hit a new 52-week low on concerns whether slowing iphone and ipad sales. the market stays a modest midday whether word being made in the boston marathon investigation and, again, moved down toward the close. >> the problem for the stock market is a simple one. the market has been in an uptrend all year. now we've had two big down days, two days for selling on heavy volume. that's a question whether there is still an uptrend in the market. trend followers are an important part of the market. if they determine there's no more upside to the market, the uptrend could become a downtrend. for "the nightly business report," the new york stock exchange. >> the federal reserve remains steady and upbeat. moderate growth in all 12 of its banking regions over the past 6 weeks with the overall economy getting a big boost from housing and strong auto sales. the central bank also said the economy performed better during march and week's jobs report and the dip in retail sales would indicate. >> but
bicycles can be checked into the docks and the technology that we are going with san francisco and popular in north america and modular and battery powered and charged using solar so if we need to move them for whatever wane we can move them across the street or expand or contract the stations and they don't require excavation or trenching or ac internal power. where is bike sharing? this is a map from a uc berkeley team that i updated and the red dots represent these systems and blue ones are older systems and library sharing and these i put in and what is happening in the united states over the last few years is primarily the east and the mid-west. there isn't a lot of action in the west but we should see things change dramatically in 2013. why is bike sharing important? i work at the mta and we see it as a complementary mode and relieves transit and it's affordable. a annual pass is $85 and if you use the system for 30 minutes and it's free. i don't know any other mode where it costs you a hundred bucks and free from there on out. it's proven quite safe. data from other system
. the technology network in san jose who made this a crucial project. i want to call out a thanks to or tactical team. we know how to make it small, not over 150 feet in the air. we have a studio, zone engineering and i have to say thanks to hmr who has been a rock star and directly one of the reasons this is happening. an extremely talented project. thank you all. i also want to just take a moment to really acknowledge that while leo and i have done a lot of things m in this world, we would not be able to do it alone. there is only one person responsible for this project and that is executive director of the arts. luminarias. i can go on and on. i think i will throughout the night. do know that she's a special person and this entire community owes her a debt of gratitude. i want to thank leo and his family for bringing the level of artistic integrity for this work that somehow slipped through the progress of a work of contemporary art parallel in art history. it has everything to do with leo and our interpretations with our discussion and that one minute that transformed how people will be rec
research with communication and information technologies. mark ho has more. >> reporter: a group of ninth graders at a school is studying physics. the students answer the teacher's question using smartphones. the correct answers are displayed instantly. the teacher can also see at a glance how well the students understand the material. this school uses the latest i.t. applications to make the classes more effective and more interesting for the students. >> if you have it on your phone you have all of them in just one compact screen. >> reporter: more than 1500 students between the ages of 13 and 17 are enrolled here. this school is one among several participating in a project called future school. it was launched by the government five years ago. >> think about what we should do in terms of introducing new ideas and teaching methods to the kids who are born in the digital age. you want critical thinkers. you want students to be able to articulate, students who can express themselves and to think critically. >> reporter: singapore places a high priority on education. about 20% of the natio
cooking technology that combines a cylindrical nonstick cooking surface surrounded by a revolutionary heating element. >> colbert: yes, vertical cooking technology which beat out its original name up-pooping. ( cheers and applause ) and that's not even the best part about this yolk-cellent product. >> and what makes rollie egg really great is their new easy-to-eat shape >> colbert: finally an egg shape that's easy to consume. the old egg shapes were so confusing. circles, ellipsoids. moist lumps. what do they think my mouth is made of? teeth? and i know what you're saying, greg. you're saying a gelatinous egg cylinder is great for breakfast but what if i want to enjoy a tube of eggs on the go? the rollie egg master has an answer for that too >> because of their round shape you can take them for a quick meal on the run. it's perfect for the office >> colbert: i know when i'm working long hours and i want to take a break there's nothing more refreshing than a hot egg rod. really. ( cheers and applause ) there's reasonable one problem i have with the egg master. even with a product as wo
. but then, i remembered, a piece of technology i invented last year while interviewing documentarian errol morris. when you interview people you're not in the room with them. you actually have a screen that you're looking at with your face on it while you ask them questions? >> that's right. >> stephen: inspired by that i created something called the ask-o-matic. it's an ipad hot glued to a bucket. ( laughter ). ( applause ) well, folks, since i debuted the ask-o-matic, all right-- ( cheers and applause ) -- since i debuted this cutting edge technology, the good folks at colbert labs have come up with a game-changing innovation-- a second bucket. now, why is it better? first of all, it's double the buckets. and i can put an iphone inside this bucket. and using face time i can put my face on the outside of the second bucket, thereby teleporting my head on to somebody else's body. and allowing me to be everywhere without going anywhere. ( laughter ) recently, i put this exciting new technology into action. i called on my reliable and expendable intern jay for the bucket maiden voyage. ( lau
, the advancing america's networking and information technology research and development act of 2013. h.r. 967 is a good bipartisan bill which i was pleased to join mrs. lummis from wyoming and mr. hall from texas in introducing. h.r. 967 is largely based on a 2009 house-passed bill that was ntroduced by then-chairman gordon and ranking member hull. but this has some updates and reflects changing to the -- changes to the information and technology landscape as well as policy and management recommendations made by an outside panel of experts charged with evaluating nitr-d program. the program involves a collaboration of 15 federal resedge and development agencies, each contributing its own unique expertise and effort. to ensure that we make most effective use of our federal r&d resources and remain a leader in these fields. h.r. 967 requires that all 15 agencies come together to develop and periodically update a strategic plan for federal invest. s in -- investments in i.t. r&d. h.r. 967 will increase support, calls for increased support for large scale long-term interdisciplinary research in i
them share their photographs, share their cell phone and iphone videos. what kind of technology is available to counterterrorism officials, to law enforcement, to enhance these visuals? i know we have an idea from movies that one can just enhance these images to a remarkable degree. is that pure fiction or is there something there that law enforcement can actually do when it comes to that technology? >> jake, i think you're on to something. first of all, the technology is dramatically improved year by year. and the opportunity to take a granular digital photograph or videos and break them down for much clearer pictures is just part of the scientific approach that the investigators on the scene have taken. it's very incremental, very methodical. think if you would of those huge jigsaw puzzles with a thousand or 5,000 pieces. you spread all over a table and you start trying to put those pieces together bit by bit. and it's pains taking work and every once in a while there may be one piece of the puzzle that jumps out at you and that is maybe what commissioner davis will talk about
these problems. when the delicate why we have these high rates of mass violence. use technology in law enforcement. neil: if you're a bad guy looking at the cost, we are going through pressure cookers, 70 bucks. theitchen timer. you could have all the ingredients to do a lot of damage for a little more than a c-note. >> and you have the internet. you don't have to -- neil: a lot of do-gooder's are going to say we have to get this stuff. that should not be easy to get. all the other ingredients there are just fair game. >> that's going down a very slippery path that will necessarily infringe on our constitutional rights which is not the path we need to be going down. we need to be using common sense approaches to government regulation on inherently dangerous items. you know, no one would say that we should not regulate certain things. you cannot drive your car at a million miles-per-hour under any circumstances in the rain and say that on your rights. they're okay with certain type of infringements. no one says we should be able to get on an airplane with a knife. neil: it did not raise
really tremendous strides and using technology to be able to assist law enforcement, the cameras, surveillance cameras, all those things become part of this process. and part of it is being lucky to have the cameras pointing in the right direction at the right time. part of it is because they were planning on using those cameras for sure s for sure va surveillance in the future. so technology has enhanced the law enforcement capability.surv future. so technology has enhanced the law enforcement capability.surv future. so technology has enhanced the law enforcement capability.surv future. so technology has enhanced the law enforcement capability.surv. so technology has enhanced the law enforcement capability.urve. so technology has enhanced the law enforcement capability. >> does the type of of twice used give you any indication of what type of group might be involved in the incident? >> no it doesn't. because i've heard people ask the question about does it because it's a very sophisticated device, does that mean it's a less sophisticated group. it might be an have had that doesn
dispatch will reveal itself in terms of reference we looked at zones and with new technology we can where a taxi is and license it to be in certain places. none of the neighborhoods outside the corridor are being serviced. we expect to lay the foundation for using modern technology so i knowed have options. and then my second question is back to the directors question is the increase of the madalinas. and this is on the budget impact of shifting the pricing of the madalinas. i was looking through my comprehensive budget and what will be the impact to the raw budget? >> up until this point we haven't, you know, decided how many of the madalinas would be when we set a price we didn't know maybe every 10 we use the impact would be this. the math is if we were to secure authorization to get 1 hundred would be times 3 hundred thousand or so. that's the budget impact our if you recall when we were developing the two year budget we're conservative we didn't know where this process was going to go. so the question is the recommendation from 2 to 3 hundred would it yeast a revenue problem? no, i
's results for the quarter. the technology giant expected to post numbers any minute now. we'll have them for you live and break them down. also ahead, million-dollar homes are not all equal. real estate agent to the stars, dolly lenz, will join me with ore top pick of the bunch we've been showing you throughout the day today. wait until you hear her top pick. back in a moment. >>> welcome back. all day here on cnbc, we have been showing you what a million dollars can buy you across the country. we sent six cnbc reporters to six very different real estate markets to check out a $1 million home. the english manor in houston knocked out its other four competitors. now the final round out puts the english manor head to head with a million-dollar cozy cottage in a mystery location. julia boorstin and jane wells taking us on a tour of these two homes. >> this two-story english garden-style house built in 2007 sits on just over a tenth of an acre. it has an attached two-car garage, a landscaped yard, and a wrought iron front door and balcony. >> this classic 1950s bungalow comes with a one-car
as using effectiveness rate as your only measure. as we continue to put in place of the technology according to the plant has minute to congress, we will live creature continents that we will have situational awareness. thatl share with you bet is an inherent problem, knowing the actual denominator. >> i thought it bizarre that we measure our success by the people we ketch but not focusing on the people who got away. is an inherent problem. >> it is a number that is used as one of the many that taken gives you an overall picture. >> the department would have to gain effective control over high risk sectors along the border. tucson, theat the rio grande sector and the laredo sector. two in texas and one in arizona. is if they know where they're going to concentrate their efforts, they're going to redirect their efforts into areas that are not as secure. >> this is the way it will work. all sectors will have protectors when in them. you want to fit your resources where the traffic is greatest. if it shifts, the resources will ship. able better to predict where we think that will move
, the technical side of that. on the police department's end i think they're working on getting the technology to more quickly record the data, so i will let them speak. there is no roadblock in them giving the data to us. it's just they're having -- there are issues on their end so we're prepared. we're deploying new staff to this function and we spent about a year designing that function so we're excited about that. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> good afternoon supervisors. i am anna and i am going to talk about pedestrian safety as it relates to schools in our city. i manage the safe routes to school project and one of the key indicators in this strategy is increase walking trips to and from school so i wanted to give you a quick overview. we are about promoting safe and active walking to and from school -- also bicycling to and from school for children and their families. we work with a number of city agencies, many are in the room. also community base partnerships and of course the school district. there are two elements to the safe routes to school program. there is the program si
which will be helpful for technology companies. it allow are for facebook and other technology media companies to recruit americans for job before hiring foreign workers. they have long complained about a shortage of high skilled workers here in the u.s. >>> a man is accused of a shooting on the las vegas strip is due in court today. 27-year-old harris was extradited and had been held there since february 2elth. -- 28th. he is being charged with multiple counts including murder. >>> an suv slammed into a dental office which happened in sit is stress -- citrus heights. an elderly woman mistakenly stepped on a gas pedal sending her car into a building and the driver was not injured. >>> special events will be held today remembering the worst disaster in history. the annual parade and dinner will commemorate the san francisco earthquake. both take place this afternoon. now only one survivor will be here and that's winnie hook, only seven years old, she was only 2 when the quake destroyed her home in san jose. >>> there is some trouble in downtown oakland, what is going on, sal? >> that'
was she was telling us to go forward 2030 in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we'
numbers of calls, general day to day and how we're meeting those cole. calls. and i think as technology changes, responsiveness probably is improved and even just with major housing improvements like sprinklers in the s-r-os and other major improvements, it might reduce the number of calls to certain areas of town. ~ i know some stations like 34 and the outer richmond have a specific focus and are always needed for different needs around the ocean beach area. but just knowing some of that data would be helpful in understanding your budget. but i'm wondering will we get that information as the budget goes forward? >> certainly. and we'll have some of that information for you next week in terms of call volume, area of concentration, and then the guidelines by which we're mandated to provide responses both from the fire suppression side and the emergency medical response. >> thank you. >> we can have that for you next week and we'll follow-up with your office if there is anything specifically you'd like to see. >> thank you, chief. much appreciated. >> thank you. >> and at this point we'll
the technology but not the behavior itself. we don't actually use the world cyber bullying. we talk about the behavior and there is tons of research we're doing in how people are behaving on our platform and the tools we can give them to resolve their issues and either through themselves and trusted audiences, et cetera, or turn to us and we don't use the term "cyber bullying" and we don't think about it's the technology. it's about the behavior itself and i know there is ongoing debate with that and cyber bullying captures people's attentions and everything i have learned from anne and the nonprofit community and the academic folks who have researched this when you use a term like "cyber bullying" you are diminishing the behavior and placing it on the technology. >> personally i hate it. it suggests robots and not humans at all. let's think about humanity, not technology. >> so i want to show you a couple of things and show you my version of a sizzle reel which is not sizzle and i am also mindful it's 4:00 o'clock on a friday so we are the last people between you and weekend, so let
. this flash-bang technology, if that explains pops people heard other than gunfire, they are a briefly devastating weapon that can just take hold of your senses and leave the suspect blinded and deafened momentarily while people move in. closed space. i have seen them used outdoors in a courtyard, a wartime backdrop in afghanistan. they are very effective. just told we have another guest. clint van zant, fbi veteran profiler. what can you add, clint? >> well, as you know my background is as a hostage negotiator. having been in similar situations like this working with tactical teams, this is a hand in glove operation. the negotiator is on the scene. he or she will be working hard to extend a hand and allows this individual to come out. with the potential explosive device of something inside the best case scenario would be for the negotiator to get the subject to come over the side of the boat, crop to the ground so that the tactical team. anything like that. then they can close, make the arrest and then administer first aid. it's going to have to work like that. they are not going to e
i'd ask if there's other technologies that you think that you have that you want to share about that may be helpful as we start to get into fire season. please share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but o
dars and sensors and missiles and stealth technology and ability to fly at supersonic speeds, it may well be the way it's designed to evade budget cutters in washington. >> more sunday at 8:00 on c-span's "q & a." the national action network recently held its annual convention in new york city. in one session, three generations of civil rights leaders discuss the future of the civil rights movement, gun violence, economic equality, and the role of black churches. the group's founder and president, the reverend al sharpton, moderated. other speakers include the reverend jesse jackson, juanita abernathy, the widow of late civil rights leader ralph aber in a they, reverend joseph lou re, and the nacc -- and the naacp chair. this is two and a half hours. >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. i'm reverend davis the coordinator for the national action network. thank you so much. thank you for being here this morning, especially all of you vf been -- who have been here this week. we have had a wonderful time this week and want to thank all of you who came from all over the country to be wi
and missiles and stealth technologies and ability to fight at supersonic speed, it may be the way it has been designed to evade budget covers. >> more with rajiv chandrasekaran tonight at 8:00 on c-span's q and a. > catherine wang and timothy zhou our second prize winners. the attendance eastern middle school in silver spring, maryland. in their video, they asked the president to make the economy and deficit reduction a party in 2013. >> we face the greatest challenge of all. a massive debt and exceeding the entire size of our company. >> the debt affects all of us. the nation is on the road to dallas -- two banker secured >> balance the budget now. >> it is a very big, political policy decision. does create large deficits into the future. we must reduce the deficit. >> it would affect a lot of people in a lot of different ways. >> it is time that we raise the bar. >> deficit is our our economy -- >> i'm pretty sure it has to do with the economy and the government. >> lack of something. debt. a debt that we can't pay. >> i really have no idea. although much of the younger generation is unawar
to be held hostage by a vendor or by technology. this data belongs to our constituents. we are simply stewards of it. in closing, i want to thank the hatchery, i want to thank our city leadership, mayor, as well as president chiu and partnering with us on this legislation. and i want to thank all of you in our community who have really done amazing things with this data. it's just a celebration of the good work that you're doing that we're here. open data would not exist without our community. so, with that, i'm going to actually hand it off to 100 plus to do a really quick demo and then we're going to do a little q & a and we'll have them come up next. >> 100 plus, we're based here in san francisco. we are interested in small healthy behaviors, ways to be healthy that don't involve going to the gym. we created a system where we recommend hops or help opportunities. these are little activities and places that are seed by users and served to other users based on location. and we used open data to seed our entire system. so, we input over a thousand things from open data including parks
attribute the not be all of its radars and sensors and missiles and stealth technology and the ability to fight at supersonic speeds. it may well be the way it has been designed to evade budget cutters in washington. >> what is the difference between e f-35 and the f-22? 22 has had its share of technical troubles. the was supposed to be height and fighter. the replacement for the f-15. it is a real high performance fighter. it is meant to win against any potential adversary in dogfights. to have fewer f-22 and then you would have more of the f-35. , forwould be the mainstay the next 40 or 50 years. if you are fighting against a sophisticated adversary, the f- 22 are going in and they are fighting in the air against the adversaries of combat aircraft. the f-35 comes then and there are carrying the bombs that will take out the other military targets. they are the second wave that come in with -- to do the real heavy lifting. these are planes that are supposed to be all purpose. the f-35 is supposed to be able to provide support to combat troops on the ground if they're fighting and some
technological society in the world. google knows everything about you, voluntarily. we talked about this yesterday. and now we're getting into, again, how much does the government know about you? if you look up how to make a bomb on any website, he has -- >> it's a whole chapter about how actually, these guys, reading his book, it makes you think these guys didn't know what they were doing. what he talks about is the future of stuff where governments can't get in at all. so they actually really won't be able to crack all of this stuff. but the true, smart criminals, and he even talks about the drug cartels in mexico have started to figure this out, who only communicate through encrypted communications. also, there's some crazy stuff going on. so it's very interesting. we will talk to him about that but also we should be talking about this news. >> let's talk about a few other stocks that you should keep your eye on this morning, as well. all of these are after the bell movers have last night. texas instruments posting better than expected first quarter earnings and revenue. and the
. this is a critical tool as we use technology on the wastewater side of our system to move forward. >> all right. commissioner. >> i hate to sound skeptical. [speaker not understood] seems like this is something on the market. doesn't seem like such a hot ticket. i don't know. i sort of read into it, looked at it. it's not a huge contract amount, but it's still 160,000 and just really sort of a cutting edge of our technology and something being used pretty widely throughout the industry. if you can speak a little to that. >> so, actually, it's three different -- i do have stephanie hair aston here who is the program manager. ~ hair ston. this is in partnership with noaa and we want to be with them. one of the cities put this in place, austin being one. i don't know what the other cities are. if you want more detail, stephanie can maybe talk a little more about the technology. >> do these things really work? i guess that's my question. >> so, we're going to be working with a research consortium. it's a research test bed within noaa. and right now the national -- we get our forecast information fr
technology division. but there is in general, no large scale face recognition search capability available to the fbi or the british government agency to help. >> why is that? why is that? >> a couple of things. performance has not been adequate for the task. it is true that the u.s. government does on a regular basis test the systems. the national institute of standards and technology regularly publishes test results on facial recognition technology. those test results are on their website. face.missed.gov. you can see how well the algorithms do in a variety of situations. a second reason is particularly right now there is no money for research or implementation. >> in this case, the quality of the images may have been an issue. the humans recognized the suspects but maybe there is not enough definition for the algorithms to pick it up? >> you're exactly right. speaker and fingerprint recognition and the like. the standard says you have to have 90 pixels of resolution between the two eyes. the pictures that i have been shown have had in the order of 12 pixels or 20 pixels between the eyes
and technology and some names hitting new 52 week lows with peabody energy and report back iran and going into the green with report mack ran. and going down below $400 the lowest levels we have seen since december of 2011 also newmont mining the best of the worst is what you need like health care or consumer staples that have concerns -- been able to hold on. the dow was down nearly 200 points but still noting the volatility is a breezy here. less volume but worth noting we are all over the place was broad based selling. back to you. cheryl: 55 minutes to go but to follow the other breaking news over the last hour coming out of boston and rich edson has the latest on what we are burning from the fbi about the boston marathon bombings and if there is a suspect? >> what we have now is the boston police department says there are no arrests and the fbi says contrary to widespread reporting there have been no arrests made. we did report on fox news there was an arrest made and the person was to escort soon but the boston police and fbi push back. fox news has confirmed authorities have an ima
can get everybody on board, not just rich, but we can find technology that will be so cheap the chinese and the indians will buy into these technologies because it is like everything else. if we get cheap, green energy everybody will buy it. john: and if it gets practical, i will invest in it. thank you, bjorn lomborg. stay with us because i keep on hearing wonderful things about electric cars. famous people have them. but you say the green cards have a dirty little secret. that's next. thank you orville and wilbur... ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. ♪ >> we can break our dependence on oil with biofuels and become the first country to have a million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. [applauding] john: even john boehner applauded. not very enthu
you a whole building of technology, how would you keep up? tech museum of innovation decides to reboot when "press: here" continues. >>> welcome backing to "press: here." silicon valley's tech museum of innovation or the tech as locals call it has a unique challenge. pit, unlike any other museum in the world, has to stay ahead of its own visitors. tech museum of innovation needs to show you what you don't already know. it is an incredible challenge considering many museum visitors work in tech themselves. often what you have seen is in an exhibit. nosily as amazing as the smartphone pocket. the tech plans to shut down and restart the $50 million reboot to become an entirely different museum. tim richy the new president of the tech among other things. he's a former death row lawyer when he was a law student. he came from to the tech from a science museum in alabama. i have loved the tech for better than ten years now that's been in that location. my goodness. we at nbc, we had a close relationship with the tech. that's always -- that always struck me as the problem. there is an engineer
than that. technology is advanced. they're going the start as close as possible to the event, to the explosions and move out from there. so, my nat data first and then slowly but surely, they'll get through the rest of those photos and video. over time, but it will be weeks. they will have a better sense of what might be connected to other factors, like the bags that they think carried the bombs. so i think it's great, get this now, because it's difficult to be preserved. >> is this, is that an approach that has evolved over the past 12 years? is that not the way they would have approached this before 9/11? before we had this huge investment in intelligence since then? >> first, we simply didn't have access to all this video and photo technology that is ubiquitous today. there are far more video cameras, hoemts and restaurants and people are walking around with iphones. the second is a much greater ability to deal with these massive amounts of data and the technology there has improved and the u.s. government and the intelligence community has been on the forefront. >> is the
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. the technology helping give the firefighters the upper hand in the fight against wildfires. >>> and why the lunch lady won't carry a gun on campus after all. >>> and today was day one of the warmup we have been expecting to arrive in the bay area. and still at this hour, in the upper 70s. concord, fairfield, clear skies for now. we'll see fog on the coast. but the seven-day forecast has even more warming heading our way. we'll look at that when we come right back. >>> in tonight's class action, clamoring to get in, a record number applied to the state's uc system, making it harder than decades to get in. there is a release of stats showing a drop of out of state students, uc has been accepting more students from outside of california in recent years because they pay much higher tuition, helping to compensate for some budget cuts. >>> and the governor wants to overhaul the way k-12 schools are funded. and a new poll shows that the majority of people in california like the idea. a poll shows that 78% of adults favor the plan to give local school districts more control on how they spend their money.
't have technology then that we have now. i that i is why they're affirmative in this area. >> greta: i hope this is, i think the caps are helpful, too. a lot of things like that are helpful to piece this together. mark, as always, thank you. >> you know, you're -- thank you, greta. >> greta: this is a fox news alert there are reports of gunshots on the campus of m.i.t.. police responding to the scene. mike tobin is live with the latest. mike? >> information is coming off the m.i.t.web site now this, is building number 32. the building is surrounded by responding agencies. the situation is considered active and dangerous, we know that the cambridge police are responding to augment the campus police there. not a lot is as far as information goes nothing to indicate there is a connection between what happened here on boliston street and what is going on on campus but chronology is owl all tlchl the fact this release happened you had individuals considered armed and dangerous or labeled armed and dangerous by the fbi. now we have nfrgs coming out of the massachusetts institution of technol
. ♪ [ male announcer ] the first look is only the beginning. ♪ ♪ this is a stunning work of technology. this is the 2013 lexus es and the first-ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. woman: everyone in the nicu -- all the nurses wanted to watch him when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment. i wouldn't trade him for the world. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. if you're caring for a child with special needs, our innovative special care program offers strategies that can help. >>> this is cnn breaking news. >>> back here live in boston, i'm brook baldwin. a rainy night in boston but hopefully a restful night in boston given what's happened over the last couple of hours. the younger suspect in the boston marathon bombings is in custody tonight, bringing an end it a massive manhunt and incredibly tense day for this entire city. i want you to take a look at this map and the time line of how
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to using facial recognition software to narrow it down. they will use all pieces of technology to try to narrow it down. bill: do you feel safe to say that the technology has made it easier or in ways has it complicated investigations like this? >> i think the more information is the better. you always have this management problem. if you get three terabytes of information that is lot a manage. i'm sure law enforcement loves to have this in the world of camera phones, the data available to try to track someone is a huge advantage. bill: what did you make of the rather overt public appeal for information? >> i think we've seen pretty dramatic developments over the last 24 hours. on the first day they asked for videos and pictures. that's to be expected. yesterday, and of course now i'm losing track, seems if this was an appeal we're running out of clues here and we want the public's help. within 24 hours of that first announcement or that announcement sort of opening it up i think we had a big break yesterday. bill: i think the hunch is to conclude what you just referred to. they're pe
technology may be the most powerful tool they have to help put a anytime face trace galt gear live in our west coast newsroom to explain how it works. >> while the debate goes on, megyn, on whether to release the surveillance pictures of potential suspects. we can tell you that authorities are saying that they are, quote, pretty clear of the man's face. pretty compelling stuff they say. and it appears to be a younger man. so let me show you how this facial recognition technology works. it's all about measuring the facial features. for example, the eye socket depth, cheekbone shape, the distance between the eyes, the nose width and the jaw line length. they take all these numbers and come up with numerical code or facial print. not the size of a fingerprint but still very very close. e tter of picture, clearly the better chance they hav matching it now, what happens is in mo cases, in fact we use an intern, let's show this video if you are just trying to identify the person is who they say they are that process is simple. take the person's driver's license. take a picture of them, facial c
a human, using stereoscopic cameras. ♪ and even stoitself if it h to. the technology may be hard to imagine. but why you would want it... is not. the 2014 e-class. it doesn't just see the future. it is the future. ♪ >> it is 23 minutes past the hour. israel is joining written and france and accusing syrian resident of using chemical weapons last month. based on visual evidence, he believes the legal nerve agent was probably used. rebels. a car bomb exploded outside the french embassy in tripoli this morning. two french guards were injured in that blast. the tsa is delaying plans to let airline passengers carried pocket knives and some sporting equipment onto airplanes. it has been opposed by flight attendants, air marshals and some 9/11 family members. the delay will allow it to review the issue. back now to dagen and connell. connell: very nice. what a crazy story. i appreciated. moving right along. thank you. dagen: apple could make some history this afternoon. posting its biggest second-quarter sales. connell: what are the analysts participating? this is the big one tonight.
on the data. lori: will you look at technology stocks, apple in pretty good and go earnings are not robust at all comment and staying clear of those and perhaps sticking with the offensive things that continue to lead at least as leaders into the rally? >> i wouldn't exclude technology here for a few reasons. number one, when you look at the performance of tech versus the s&p or the value segment of the standard and poor's, we have a pretty good underperformance so we had some significant lagging and some notable names have been dragging down the index but ultimately if you look at the balance sheets that are relatively clean, relatively consistent cash flow from many of these, many of them are beginning to take dividendss or maturing and you can buy many attractive valuations. i wouldn't run away from technology. i would sharpen my pencil and decide which one you want to own as part of a diversified portfolio. lori: with apple shares, is that an opportunity for you? >> apple as an indication, broader indication of what is going on with technology, speak to it that way, a plastic example o
someone invests in us because we have the technology leadership, it manifests itself in products that lead the competition and allows us to win in markets. >> perhaps it's time to ramp that spending up, jim, to figure out other avenues in which they'll be able to deploy their chips. >> they cut it to 12 billion because they were able to reuse some of the factories. the interesting thing is goldman is saying you're spending three times what you're spending in 2009 and getting the same bang for the buck. intel which is a fabulous manufacturer, is spending too much money and not getting any reward for it. they're paying good dividend while you're waiting. >> what are you waiting for? for ultra tablets? >> i think that comes out, gdot. it's not like they haven't figured out transitions in the past and what was the ability to do just that. >> ultimately, they've been able to reinvent and reinvent by making things smaller and smaller, another really nice guy, but this was supposed to be a good-bye swan song and instead it turned a rap on the call, i felt. i felt like people were saying gross mar
, the cloud, the smartphone, the tablet, fracing, 3-d printing. all these new technologies are still throwing off productivity, and i believe productivity larry is what gives us the profits. >> right. >> in other words, productivity. >> cost control. >> cost control and productivity, absolutely right. >> all right. another point. i'm going to put a chart up on the full screen, i home. commodities are slumping a bit, and so are long-term interest rates. it's actually trading in a range, but a lot of people worry about rising interest rates. why they worry about that, i don't know, but they are. this chart suggests that with commodities slump, we have no fears of rising interest rates, and, therefore, we ought to just take that right off the map. >> yeah. i think gold was overvalued at 1,700, 1,800. still overvalued at $1,400 an ounce. i personally believe gold is appropriately valued at about 800 bucks. its decline does not mean the economy is going back into recession. there's some people that believe that, but we're still the plow horse economy. that's the phrase we've used. it's not a race
, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion is still not known; officials said today there's no evidence of foul play. a man using his cell phone captured the moment last night when the west fertilizer company plant exploded. that flattened buildings within a five blocks rand sent ockwes outiles around. >> i was actually picked up and th fy bout te end of m
with dual-air technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body eds. each of your bodies. it's part of the sleep number collection-innovations that individualize the way you sleep. from the perfect pillow ... to temperature-balancing bedding. and it's the only place you can save $400 on the only memory foam bed with sleep number technology that adjusts to each of you. plus special financing on all beds. you will only find sleep number at one of our over 400 stores nationwide, where queen mattresses start at just $699. sleep number. comfort. individualized. to find your store, visit sleepnumber.com. >>> i am joined by senator chuck schumer, democrat from new york. and south carolina republican senator lindsey graham with whom we just mentioned cooperated and came up recently with a bipartisan immigration bill. i want to get to that as well the effect of boston on that discussion. let me first ask you, you heard congressman mccaul written a letter to some of the feds saying i wanted to know what you knew about this older suspect. it seems that in fact this is a man who did come
are ready to move that line yet again after boston. and he said technology was the key. and he's on the homeland security committee, mike rogers from alabama. i asked him saying that many civil libertarians have some problems with some of the things that are proposed and they want to do. put more cameras ever-place. some of the other security measures. and he said, and i'm paraphrasing here, well, civil libertarians have a problem with pretty much everything. i think that he is -- i think he was kind of joking, but not really. he came back to it and said, you know, i think the naysayers and civil libertarians are in the minority and most americans believe that they -- that we have to do more in the security realm. you know, there are others like senator rand paul and another -- kind of a growing minority, i will say a minority, but a growing population up on capitol hill who are concerned about where that line is with, you know, security and giving up freedom. >> yeah. and that's the question i think a lot of people have too. and you're talking about the fact that more american
how to connect our technology, people and ideas and figure out how to cooperate and most importantly make a commitment to prevent these deaths from happening. 10 years ago there was a young woman named lenora alexander, she was a healthy 11-year-old irl and she underwent elective surgery to correct something at a prestigious hospital. the awoke at 2:00 a.m., victim of respiratory arrest, caused by a drug that was intended to ease her pain. but if she had been monitored continuously after the surgery, hospital staff and lenora may have been alerted and leah would probably have been rescued. but there are other sort of preventable deaths that deals with washing hands, transferring of infections when hands aren't washed properly. monitoring has already picked up by lenora's tragic situation. her situation is not unique, unfortunately. a summit came together to figure out what can we do to solve the problem going back to the coordination, cooperation that i spoke about earlier. the fact is at this patient safety, technology and science summit, people, trained professionals came togethe
the impacts of extreme weather events, clean energy technologies and the threats of rising temperatures across the country. in contrast, we are not aware of any republican member who has spoken on the house floor about the dangers of climate change and the committee of jurisdiction is not even willing to hold a hearing to hear what the scientists and experts have to say about the issue. i have a message to house republicans, you can't make climate change go away by ignoring the problem. . . . the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from washington rise? mrs. mcmorris rodgers: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. mcmorris rodgers: thank you, madam speaker. today, our hearts remain heavy -- our hearts are heavy for those who lost their lives on monday's unspeakable act of violence. for those who remain in critical condition, for the parents who lost their 8-year-old son, and for the families whose loved ones never came home from the boston marathon. while our sorrow is great, so, too, is o
technologies which makes gene sequencing machines. they finished down 1%, but life technologies jumped to $73 a share. glaxosmithkline touched an all time high after the food and drug administration gave a better than expect ed review of an experimental treatment for lung disease. this could open the way for approval when the new treatment will be reviewed by an fda panel on wednesday. gsk gained 1.5% to $49 a share. >> as the media space reshapes itself, btig research began coverage of netflix with a $250 per share price. noted that the service is being offered as part of internet bundles as well as cable providers, rich greenfield said netflix has an improved price relationship. netflix gained about 2% on an otherwise down day today. energy was the worst performing sector today as oil dropped below $89 a barrel. the blue chip oil, they were near the bottom of the dow. each down about 3% in today's trade. >> solid quarterly earnings from charles schaub, but missed by a penny a share. partly because the firm weighed fees on money market funds. shares tumbled almost 4% to $16 a share. >> and o
it a hub for developing new technology to increase overseas production. construction of the 950,000 square meter plant started in 2007. the new factory will mainly produce compact cars for the domestic market this summer. solar panels are installed on the roof of the factory. they're expected to generate up to 2.6 megawatts of electricity. that's the highest level of output among auto plants in japan. many japanese auto makers have been shifting production overseas to try to capture a bigger market share in emerging countries. >> translator: this facility will play the role of the mother plant. we will develop new production and other technologies here. and use them in overseas factories. >>> many of the world's top businesses have their eyes set on brazil. the country will host the world cup in 2014 and the olympics two years later. another competition is under way, too, among managers looking for cheap labor. nhk world has more. >> reporter: brazil's major cities are experiencing a construction boom. wages are rising, and businesses are having trouble finding enough workers. this is posi
-edge engineering technology, computer information systems, networking and communications management -- the things that our students need to know in the world today. our country needs more college grads to help fill all the open technology jobs. to help meet that need, here at devry university, we're offering 4 million dollars in tech scholarships for qualified new students. learn more at devry.edu.
lights and you get incredible mastery of technology to go with art. these are the things we do to celebrate. i love this city more and more even though we are working our toe nails down to make it better, you turn and see it's really worth it because everyone loves this city and you know we all appreciate it. thank you for working together, thank you for going beyond the boundaries and thank you for reaching out to each other and asking for help and solutions. so that we don't take the person on the sidewalk and say we have a problem and we have a problem. we do something about it. we are working with everybody to make things better. we have partners, they are showing up on market street. 3300 residential units being constructed, and we have venture capitalist. we need more. this is a big way of saying thanks to everybody for working together. another great center here and we are going to make sure this center flowers with all the other plans that we have. thank you for working together. >> thank you. for your leadership today. today i was with the representative for the footba
're mandated by law and they're using this for an excuse to lay people off. your technology coordinator lost his job and that might not be legal >> good morning. i'm a student at city college. i want to voice my opinion on the accreditation related to city college. i wanted to give a little bit of my story are city college has given me a second chance out of high school i wasn't prepared to go straight into a four-year but the city college has provided that he with that. i'm on track. and i've bend so much and if we continue to put education, you know, aside, you know, a lot of people, you know, have the are smart and capable, you know, we're going to be i guess not giving them the opportunity to succeed. and some of the city colleges are producing some the leader and many of my peers are going on to higher institutions. so, please keep city college in mind >> good morning, mr. chairman. i'm not going to sing to you but it's a real pleasure to address i today. as it was said it was approved by over 70 percent of san franciscans. i'm talking to you as a instructor. i want you to use the p
networking. she served on president obama technology working group and delivered its group to congress and youth safety on the internet and you can read her plug. how's that for a plug? >> thank you very much. our parents guide is free and can be distributed at schools or parent nights or whatever, so we're happy to make them available to you at connect safety .org so a little bit more of the big picture. this is amazing panel of people who have resources and campaigns that can support and reinforce your fine work. so i am glad you stayedand we learned about bullying and preventions and solutions and just to reinforce getting the accurate picture bullying is a serious problem but it's not an epidemic. it's not on the rise. daift finkelhorn and director of the research center university of new hampshire and reviewed studies and bullying among youth is actually down in recent years. his colleague have actually stopped using the term of "bullying" and refer to peer aggression and i can go into definitions but i won't bore you. a subset of bullying is also not on the rise and based
of massachusetts institute of technology in cambridge, massachusetts, just a short drive away. again, we can tell you at least right now, nbc is reporting that the two suspects believed to be in this incident are the same two suspects that were fingered for the marathon bombings in boston on monday. we will follow pictures, we will, of course, follow news for you out of this and we will interrupt our guests and programming as needed to bring you those updates throughout the program this morning. in the meantime, let's get a check on how markets are trading. first, let's head out to singapore where li sixuan is keeping an eye on things. what can you tell us? >> indeed, thank you, kelly. a lot of green arrows in asia today as the greater china markets are indeed the stellar outperformer with the shanghai composite, the hang seng gaining some 2%. also, lots of speculation around a potential imminent widening of the u.n.'s trading ban. we saw technical rebound in financials and commodity plays, especially from the big aussie miners that were hit hard yesterday. metals soared almost 10% today. bhp bil
are announcing today with our technology community and certainly with the families of sandy hook. i would like to thank the families who flew all the way here from newtown, connecticut for joining us here today in san francisco. and while you are far away from home, i hope that you feel welcomed in our city. as a father of two girls myself, i can't imagine the pain and grief that you have suffered these past three months. and i have profound respect for your courage and for your commitment, for turning this grief into action. the tragic and horrifying events in sandy hook elementary school, touched every american, a tragedy of this magnitude brings along with it the pain, the shock, and the disbelief. and it forces all of us to ask the question how can we prevent such terrible events? how do we protect our children? our youth, our residents? for san francisco, it is very important for us to continue to have an open dialogue regarding gun violence so that we can answer these questions ourselves. today, we honored the three-month anniversary of the tragic mass shootings at sandy hook, elementary
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